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Border Reminiscences Volume 1871 Randolph Barnes Marcy

Border Reminiscences Volume 1871

Randolph Barnes Marcy

Published September 12th 2013
ISBN : 9781230309408
Paperback
76 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1872 edition. Excerpt: ... CHAPTER IX. PEAIEIEMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1872 edition. Excerpt: ... CHAPTER IX. PEAIEIE INDIANS. Indians as Prisoners.--Winnebago Dandy.--Push-met-te-haw.-- Treatment of Prisoners. -- Indian Diplomacy. -- A Comanches Opinion of the Pale Faces.--A civilized Indians Opinion of the Government.--Black Beaver.--A facetious Indian.--Aboriginal Precocity.--Aborigines as they are. The Prairie Indians, who are probably as expert equestrians as the Bedouin Arabs, always go into battle well mounted, and, when properly armed, are most formidable enemies. Formerly, when these people possessed no fire-arms, but were solely dependent on the bow and arrow, which has a very limited effective range, they were far inferior to the white man in action- but, now that they are well provided with rifles and revolvers, this difference has greatly diminished, if not entirely disappeared. And why should not this be the case % The prairie warrior has sufficient courage, and is an adept in the art of war as taught and practiced in the school of his ancestors. He has made this his study from childhood, and has learned all the arts, manoeuvres, and subterfuges necessary to prosecute successful partisan warfare- and although his strategy may not in all respects coincide with the teachings of Vauban or Mahan, yet, when we are forced to make war upon him, we are compelled to adopt a portion of his tactics or make failures. One of the reasons why the Indians fight so desperately when hard pressed may be attributed to the fact that they have the utmost horror of being taken prisoners and held in captivity. They themselves make slaves of their captives, and they have no other conception of the condition of a prisoner of war save that of the most abject and degrading bondage, which to them is more repulsive than death. Some years ago our...